Best of 2013

Best photos & moments of 2013! 12/31/2013

My personal picks for my best photos / moments of 2013. What an amazing ride it has been! I never imagined that when I first started this, my first Instagram account, back in June of this year that: I would start with nothing but my photos, and gain almost 1,500 followers, and some great new friends, and that this would lead to me building this website, and my photography Facebook Page! I want to take a moment to thank all of those who have featured my photos on Instagram, added me as a member of their artistic photography communities, liked and followed & commented on Instagram, Facebook, and of course here on this website! You all make doing this great fun, worthwhile, and inspirational!!!! To all of my friends who have liked my work on my personal Facebook page, and liked my photography page, this all applies to you as well! I wish each and every one of you everywhere much success, health, and happiness in 2014! THANK YOU! Your support means more to me than you know! With that, here is the video. This is only just the very beginning…. You’re gonna hear me roar!

To see the shorter Instagram version, please visit my Instagram page.

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James River Sunset

Live Oaks in silhouette against a brilliantly colored sunset along the James River.  12/28/2013

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Sunset from Fort Monroe National Monument / Old Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia. After a beautiful mild winter afternoon for a walk around enjoying the sights we were treated to this spectacular sunset looking west up the James River. Located at the mouth of the James river where it meets the Chesapeake Bay, Old Point Comfort has been in use as a military installation of some kind and varying names since 1609, and is also home to the second oldest lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay, the Old Point Comfort Light. (seen in prior photos) Many more photos of this trip to follow.

Old Point Comfort Light & Keepers Residence

Old Point Comfort Lighthouse and Lighthouse Keepers Residence. 12/28/2013

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Old Point Comfort Lighthouse and lighthouse keepers house at Fort Monroe National Monument / Old Point Comfort. This view is from the top of the old fort which stands around 40 feet tall. The water in the background to the left is the moth of the James River, to the right is the lower Chesapeake Bay. Located at the mouth of the James river where it meets the Chesapeake Bay, this lighthouse was first built in 1802 and has been in use since, though it is now automated, and has been since 1973. It is the second oldest lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay, and was captured by the British and used as an observation post in the War of 1812. Old Point Comfort has been in use as a military installation of some kinds and varying names since 1609. Many more photos of this trip to follow.

Old Point Comfort Light

Historic Old Point Comfort Light Still Shines. 12/28/2013

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Old Point Comfort Lighthouse at Fort Monroe National Monument / Old Point Comfort. A beautiful mild winter afternoon for a walk around enjoying the sights. Located at the mouth of the James river where it meets the Chesapeake Bay, this lighthouse was first built in 1802 and has been in use since, though it is now automated, and has been since 1973. It is the second oldest lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay, and was captured by the British and used as an observation post in the War of 1812. Old Point Comfort has been in use as a military installation of some kinds and varying names since 1609. Many more photos of this trip to follow.

Live Oaks & Wide Water View

Beautiful River View from Old Point Comfort where the James River empties into the Chesapeake Bay. 12/28/2013

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View from atop the historic old gun / cannon battery at Fort Monroe National Monument / Old Point Comfort. A beautiful mild winter afternoon for a walk around enjoying the sights. This is looking west up the James River through a couple of small Live Oak trees. Located at the mouth of the James river where it meets the Chesapeake Bay, Old Point Comfort has been in use as a military installation of some kinds and varying names since 1609. It is also home to the Old Point Comfort lighthouse which was built and first used in 1802. Many more photos of this trip to Virginia’s southeast Coast to follow.

Swampy River Reflections

Near perfect reflections in the slow moving “black” waters of the Black Water River. 12/27/2013

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12/27/2013 Swamp River Reflections: Loblolly, Longleaf pines, Bald Cypress reflect nearly perfectly in the slow moving ‘black’ water of the Blackwater River. The river is surrounded by many cypress swamps, marshes, lowlands and pine lands and sand hills. This area is surrounded by the Blackwater Ecological Preserve, the Zuni Pine Barrens, and the Antioch Pines Natural Area Preserve in far southern Isle of Wight county, near the village of Zuni. Virginia. This type of environment / ecosystem is common on the coastal plain of extreme southeastern Virginia.

Virginia Pine Barrens Winter Sunset

A lone sentinel Loblolly Pine silhouetted against a beautiful winter sunset in the Zuni Pine Barrens. 12/26/2013

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Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris) restoration project in the Zuni Pine Barrens, Isle of Wight county in extreme southeastern Virginia. This area is comprised of by the Zuni Pine Barrens, the Antioch Pines Natural Area Preserve, and, the Blackwater Ecological Preserve. This is an endangered native pine to this area of VA and much of the southeastern USA. This area was once covered in extensive Longleaf Pine Forest Savanna covering about 90 million acres with vast expanses of it in southeastern Virginia. About 97% of this original forest was destroyed, largely by logging / naval stores practices back in the 1800s. In this area the forest is managed. Some areas allowed to grow while others are harvested. These harvested areas of loblolly pine are being restored with Longleaf pine in an attempt to restore some of this native pine savannah in Virginia. This area will not be logged again, and is subjected to low intensity prescribed burns as it is a highly fire dependent ecosystem. This particular pine is virtually fire proof under these conditions, especially when young. The soil is mainly sand in this area of the state as it is on much of the coastal plain. These trees will take 100-160 years to reach maturity and will live 500 or more years and will attain heights of 150 or more feet eventually.